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Stanley Steam Automatic

Posted by Peter Brow 
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 02, 2019 10:17AM
Jeremy,

That is pretty expensive program for the small shop machinist.

When selecting a CAD program, the first thing that must be considered is what purpose it will serve. If you're opening a full blown engineering design shop then yes, a full blown engineering program is needed. The home and small shop machinist don't need all that. I have an inexpensive 2D (3D, but not really) program with built in CAM that has served me well for years, then I have an inexpensive 3D modeler and an inexpensive Solids CAM program that do everything I need and more. Key word there is "inexpensive", all of my software together can be had for around a thousand dollars. My only concern when I'm laying lines down on the screen is so that they can be used by the CAM program to produce G-Code.

Occasionally, when fabricating, I lay lines on the screen that will accurately provide, angles, line lengths etc, it's much better than trying to remember the math on the calculator, and I don't think I could even find my old Texas Instruments Ti-30, and if I did, it probably doesn't work anymore smiling smiley Incidentally, that is the best (my opinion) calculator there is for machinists. However, even a simple CAD program is better.

-Ron



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/02/2019 10:19AM by IronChief.
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 02, 2019 12:32PM
Hi Ron,

The chief reason for me was ease of use. I can draw just about anything. I work with the 3D model then break it down to 2D. I look at it as something that CAD SW 2000 lasted for 16 years, and is used today. So I was offered a 2016 seat at a less price I have both now

Talking about the creative features, I couldn't find a product that was easy to use ..
There are easy ways to send a SW file (other file types) and I get what I need from the machine shop.

Just want to edit, I have legal use for SW 2000 and SW 2016. Here is another forum that is a good example of what can be done smiling smiley

[www.fieldlines.com]



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 01/02/2019 04:37PM by Jeremy Holmes.
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 03, 2019 08:53AM
Here is a Bolsover boiler I drew with Moi3D about a year ago, it's an easy to use program.

-Ron


Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 03, 2019 03:22PM
Hi Ron,

Looks good is that a 3D model.. Sorry to hijack this topic we should make a new one for 3D CAD..
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 03, 2019 04:38PM
Hi Jeremy,

Yes, that is a 3D model, took about 15 minutes to make. That software is really easy to use. They have a 30 day free fully operating trial and they have a few videos on the website to show how to use it. Not difficult at all. And the guy that creates it won't bug ya about licensing etc. He was one of the engineers from Rhino, left and made his own product. I emailed Solidworks about 15 years ago and they still send me emails every few days. The models can be exported as an STL that can be used by a CAM program for surfacing tool path. All this sounds technical, it's all really very easy.

Yeah sorry Peter, we took your thread off course, I'll bring it back, here is a 3D model I made of an automatic a few years ago.

-Ron


Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 03, 2019 04:45PM
I just drew this in like less than a minute

-Ron


Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 03, 2019 05:45PM
Hi Ron ya its easy for me to make a helix. The assembly drawing using individual parts can be tricky. Believe it or not, my gif animation for my engine cycle was made using solidworks files. [flashsteam.com]
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 04, 2019 06:25PM
Neat stuff, Ron and Jeremy!

Hijack threads at will; I don't mind. It's those pesky Forum Admins you gotta look out for. smiling smiley One "start a new thread" from Authority Figures, and I'm "siryessir!" Somehow I seem to fit in this outfit, maybe kinda like "Oddball" [Donald Sutherland] in the weirdly anachronistic war/heist flick "Kelly's Heroes". Is it 1944 or 1969? Or 2000... whoa, what year is it, anyway? Well, whatever the number is, hope y'all are having a great new year...

CAD is "one of these days" for me. When well done, as you guys do, it sure looks great. Graphpaper/mechanical pencil, and lots of fine-point eraser/redraw, fit my shop purposes for now. I just finished 12 multi-piece sheets of paper drawings for the "Cable-Operated Valve", 34 parts, most unmodified/off-the-shelf, and all bandsaw/drill press machining, in the "Easy-Clean Vaporizer" system, in 3 days, several hours per day [I don't "punch the clock"]. Pro shops can work from that, for not much extra charge for paper-to-CADCAM conversion. And I don't currently plan to out-shop anything.

[www.youtube.com]

[www.youtube.com]

"No negative waves, man.". LOL


Peter



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 01/04/2019 06:48PM by Peter Brow.
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 04, 2019 07:24PM
Ron

When you insert your 3d model is it possible to rotate and zoom areas.

Its been something I have been working on recently. Here is an example where the model can be rotated from its image and there is no requirement of the program.

Quote
link to externally
[www.fieldlines.com]
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 04, 2019 07:24PM
Quote: "The assembly drawing using individual parts can be tricky"


The software I use, everything snaps easily, a little too easily at times. That software is really powerful, despite it's rather monochrome screen.

-Ron
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 04, 2019 07:40PM
I have a 1 pipe that needs to fit precisely, it has a helix about 3 turns, then is routed to its connections.

The only way I will be able get the proper fit just hand the CAD files to the CNC bender and what not could be established is done..
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 04, 2019 08:22PM
Quote: "When you insert your 3d model is it possible to rotate and zoom areas."

Yes, it is four buttons on the bottom the screen, just click in those and it can be zoomed, moved, rotated dynamically etc,

-Ron


Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 12, 2019 08:14AM
Quote: "I have a 1 pipe that needs to fit precisely, it has a helix about 3 turns, then is routed to its connections.

The only way I will be able get the proper fit just hand the CAD files to the CNC bender and what not could be established is done..""

That is highly unlikely that they would be able to do that, and even more unlikely they would even try to make it a slip fit in an assembly. Reason being, It would be very difficult for them to get it perfect without several tries and there is no point to have that sort of accuracy with that type of fabrication component. Just like with Ofeldt coils. It's like a coil spring, the two ends can be flexed rather easily in relation to one another, if more is needed, just heat the ends with a torch and adjust them any direction needed. We see the coil as a small compact unit, but remember, it's 10 er so feet of pipe, unwound, how much flex is there?

-Ron
Re: Stanley Steam Automatic
January 12, 2019 03:25PM
Quote
Ron
That is highly unlikely that they would be able to do that

That may be true. I think this is where rocket science meets steam engines. I have looked at many rocket engines and I wonder how the hell they bent the tubing for that.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/12/2019 03:25PM by Jeremy Holmes.
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