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high speed rotary valve

Posted by HYDRAGON 
high speed rotary valve
April 04, 2015 10:23PM
Hello,

Need advice,are there rotating joints or valves wich are meant for high speed operation?,lets say 10000rpm?
Thanks in advance.

Regards,Adnan.
Re: high speed rotary valve
April 05, 2015 10:53AM
I know of lots of designs that are running 20,000 to over 30,000 rpm, but I assume you also want to seal high steam pressures. Labrynth seals are the only ones I know of that would work. As far as I can find out, leakage is always a problem with rotary valves at significant pressures. Tom Kimmel's site has several rotary valve engines.

Grame Vagg
Emory Frank Stover
Richard Smith
Richard Smith patent

I'm sure there are many others.

Lohring Miller
Re: high speed rotary valve
April 05, 2015 02:14PM
Almost by definition, labyrinth seals leak. The labyrinth imparts turbulence to flow, this turbulence creates a restriction that diminishes flow. Multiple labyrinths in series further restrict flow but, as you can see, turbulence only occurs if there actually is flow through the valve seal. Greater restriction is going to require larger labyrinth seals, so there are practical limits to the amount of restriction possible.
Re: high speed rotary valve
April 05, 2015 05:21PM
Hi all:

I'd like to clear up a misconception here:

The Stover engine does NOT utilize a rotary valve. The term "rotor" has been used in the description on Tom Kimmel's website and without careful observation one might be led to believe there's a rotary valve in there.

In this case the "rotor" is actually the (sliding) camshaft which actuates the pilot valves which are simple balls on seats. The beauty of this is that the forces on the actuation system for the pilot valves are very low--and so a simply fabricated cam becomes possible. In the case of the Stover the cam takes the form of a structural tube with sheet metal formed around it; the sheet metal is cut to form the several steps of cutoff and reverse, and could easily be formed by hand with files and hand-held grinding devices.

I hope this helps.

Bill
Re: high speed rotary valve
April 06, 2015 08:55AM
Bill Hinote Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Hi all:
>
> I'd like to clear up a misconception here:
>
> The Stover engine does NOT utilize a rotary valve.
> The term "rotor" has been used in the description
> on Tom Kimmel's website and without careful
> observation one might be led to believe there's a
> rotary valve in there.
>
> In this case the "rotor" is actually the (sliding)
> camshaft which actuates the pilot valves which are
> simple balls on seats. The beauty of this is that
> the forces on the actuation system for the pilot
> valves are very low--and so a simply fabricated
> cam becomes possible. In the case of the Stover
> the cam takes the form of a structural tube with
> sheet metal formed around it; the sheet metal is
> cut to form the several steps of cutoff and
> reverse, and could easily be formed by hand with
> files and hand-held grinding devices.
>
> I hope this helps.
>
> Bill

I did understand this, but accidentally included it on my quickly assembled list. I think all rotary valves run at any significant speed are going to leak. The rotary valves I'm familar with are in two stroke engines and are oil sealed at relatively low pressures but high rpm.

Lohring Miller
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