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experimental boiler design/build

Posted by Bill Hinote 
high performance from watertube boilers
December 05, 2012 08:03PM
Been looking for this quote for some months, saw it earlier:

>Why is velocity so obviously critical in the performance of monotubes? The previous owner of Skylark has a theory which I >believe to be correct. As the water flows and heats at some variable point along the tube it begins to form tiny steam >bubbles on the inside wall. These must tend to stick to the surface just as they do to the bottom of a saucepan when you boil >water in it. The steam bubbles seem obstinately glued to the metal. In order for a monotube to operate efficiently the water >must flow fast enough to scour bubbles away IMMEADIATLY they form. The conductivity of any vapour is thousands of times >worse than water and maybe 100,000 times worse than copper alloys like Kunifer. If as I believe the dramatic increase in >performance is due to the increased water velocity then I thought maybe I can juggle a few numbers and come up with a very >interesting, if empirical figure that represents a likely MINIMUM velocity to aim for when designing very small monotubes like >Skylark's and the really tiny tubes I have in Tiddler's Monotube.

Found it on this website, looking for more supporting info on my latest thread:

[www.flysteam.co.uk]

All comments appreciated!!

They're talking about 120 lb/hr/sq. ft. steam generation, with reliability. Of course the stack temps are off the chart and the boiler efficiency is quite low as a result--but this shows how far things can be pushed IMO.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/05/2012 08:03PM by Bill Hinote.
lucky find
December 07, 2012 07:32PM
Hi all:

I'm back in the steam business, "all ahead full-steam"!!

My cylinders are due to arrive next week with the further exhaust belt mods, look for progress on the relevant thread for that.

The boiler is finally taking shape, some mods from the original concept to conform to "spec" items as you will soon see.

I've located the necessary suppliers for parts and materials to finally assemble the boiler project; this has taken some time and along with my recent move and my newfound employment as a property manager I have had to make some adjustments in my lifestyle and my organization of time.

The attached thumbnail illustrates a major score for me. This is a 48-inch length of 8-in nominal diameter schedule 120 PVC pipe. This stuff is hard to find for mere mortals, it's used in city water supplies and is quite expensive. The rigidity and the 8.5" actual OD makes it an ideal mandrel to wind the drum coils for my project. I engaged the services of a septic specialist and had the sense to ask him if he knew where I could find the item just described, it was in his storage yard and he gave it to me, no charge!! You'll soon see why I needed this exact diameter, it's part of my quest to create a boiler with minimum effort but reasonable efficiency.

I'll mount it on some centers and find a way to clamp it to my bench--and make a handle of some kind to turn it.

Feels good to be back to progress on my project.

Bill


test wind
December 10, 2012 06:47PM
Today I bought a 10-foot length of 3/8" OD copper tubing, "refrigeration grade", at Home Depot. That means it's only about .020" wall thickness and is thus unsuitable for a copper-based boiler coil.

Nonetheless I was determined to use this example for a preliminary test, winding it over my newly acquired "mandrel" as described in the previous post. If this junk survives the test, my acquisition of a 100-foot coil of type K (thick-wall) (thanks, Rolly!) will easily do the job I need it to.

The result is posted as a thumbnail. It's not totally perfect, the coil diameters are consistent but the axial bends need to be controlled or even eliminated. Ideally, the tube should enter the coiling device as a totally straight length to provide the necessary consistency. The finished coil will be left on the mandrel to allow lacing-up to spacers to provide the necessary gaps between coils for my purpose

This is going to be fun and rewarding with very little effort IMO. I've ordered the actual type K tubing for my project and I hope to show a useable result in the near future.

Stay tuned, forward progress.

Bill


Re: experimental boiler design/build
December 11, 2012 04:50AM
Hi Bill

Look into lining your fire box with ceramic blanket material or equivalent. Look on internet for forge construction. There are other things you would need. Refractory coating Rigidizer could be used.

Andy
Re: experimental boiler design/build
December 15, 2012 04:49PM
Bill, I found some youtube vid examples making forges using ceramic blankets. I have not had any problems handling it bare handed. A dust mask is a good idea.

Forge made from a 16oz propane tank.

And from a 20lb tank.

In my tests I use thinner material and layer it.

I am looking at a high temperature carbon fiber outer shell.

Andy
Re: experimental boiler design/build
December 15, 2012 05:59PM
Hi Andy:

Thanks for your inputs about alternative combustion chamber fabrication methods.

Right now I can only take the route of the "cheap seats"; there's so much to try and get up to speed and to just do it with the least time, effort and $$ possible.

Your recommendations will have to wait until after I have something running--and I can assure you, that's a big hurdle!

Bill

edit: I spent about an hour in my newly-established garage/shop today; although I needed to go to work in my new job I tried but was also nearly unable to endure working on my steam project in the environs of the 35 deg. F temps there. I need to find a way to get the temps up, working on that or getting pneumonia instead.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/15/2012 06:18PM by Bill Hinote.
Re: experimental boiler design/build
December 22, 2012 04:47PM
Progress as of 12/22/2012:

Attached is an image of the first check of my 3/8" OD SS tubing coil.

I didn't want the hassle of winding the SS tubing and probable failure; instead I chose to purchase a prewound item from NY Brew Supply, it's called a "wort" and is used to chill the liquids during the process of brewing your own beer. The additional cost over buying a coil of unspecified diameter to wind my own was only about $25--a bargain IMO.

Now you know why I was so adamant about finding that monstrous piece of PVC pipe, its OD matches the nominal ID of the coil; it's going to be easy to pull the coil tight against the PVC mandrel (already tried that) and then safety-wire it to my spacer strips. That's going to be another story, I'm optimistic about stabilizing the coil and creating consistent spacing between the turns of the coils.

Winding the copper is going to be a little arduous but a relatively simple job, it's fully annealed so only needs to be done patiently and with a lot of care.

We're getting there, stay tuned.

Bill



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/22/2012 05:16PM by Bill Hinote.


Re: experimental boiler design/build
December 25, 2012 08:19PM
Note that the Educator buggy design uses all copper coils and never had a scorched tube. The controls, including the last-pass safety shutdown, kept the copper from overheating. If you use this control correctly, you can run tubes of nearly any conductive material. For all the steam generators I have built or operated, the only tube I have only blown was when it was fired up with city water supply but no overheat safety at all, a learning experience which I never repeated.

Karl Petersen
Re: experimental boiler design/build
December 25, 2012 09:25PM
Karl Petersen Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Note that the Educator buggy design uses all
> copper coils and never had a scorched tube. The
> controls, including the last-pass safety shutdown,
> kept the copper from overheating. If you use this
> control correctly, you can run tubes of nearly any
> conductive material. For all the steam generators
> I have built or operated, the only tube I have
> only blown was when it was fired up with city
> water supply but no overheat safety at all, a
> learning experience which I never repeated.

Thanks for your comments, Karl!

Based on my experience long ago (burning up a Maxi-SASS coil from under feeding of feedwater) I feel quite comfortable with the so-called "Lamont style" of boiler with its massive overcirculation and thus protection of the coils.

Too soon old, too late schmart!, as they say.

Bill



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/09/2013 10:23PM by Bill Hinote.
Re: experimental boiler design/build
December 28, 2012 11:52AM
I have recently been winding coils of Stainless Steel 304 that comes in 100' coils from McMaster-Carr and having no problems at all. The first boiler used about 300' of 1/4" and 250' of 3/8" in helical coils starting with a 1 1/2" mandrel and ended up with a coil stack 12" diameter and 14" long. The flame came in from the outside and exhausted out through the middle. We had no problem at all winding the coil. The tubing did not flatten much and there was just enough spring back to space it properly. We put a burner on it with 4.5 gallons per hour kerosene and pumping 1 gallon per minute water and made all kinds of steam. It was pretty saturated because I had buried the superheater coil way down and then could not slow down the water pump enough to make hot steam. There seemed to be quite high water side back pressure because of the small tubing, several hundred pounds. The air side back pressure did not appear to be a problem as we got a good clean burn with a Beckett burner. Of course we learned a great deal on the first one. The next one will be prettier with better tubing spacing as we have developed a very clever spacing system and it will wind much quicker because of a few jigs. We think we are getting good helical flow of the combustion gases the way it is set up. There are similarities with combustion gas flow to that of the Cyclone steam generator, although Harry is using pancake coils wound tight and touching, 12 of them. We are using spaced helical coils with the aspect ratio of the coil stack being different than Cyclone's. It is always fun to watch steam shooting out into the air at high rates of flow. Tom Kimmel
Re: experimental boiler design/build
December 28, 2012 02:26PM
Tom,
Congrats on your great coil winding efforts and progress. By the way Harry's/Cyclone tube coils are not touching and the gas pass area/velocity/heat transfer capacity are carefully calculated so that every section has a good factor of safety and proper spacing for both the low pressure gas pass and high heat transfer factors.
It sounds like you are in this try to duplicate in a tubing way the original "E" Doble as far as tube sizes in a radial format.The original "E" with small econmiser tubes at high firing rates had a rather great pressure drop in the boiler and places demands upon the feedwater pumps. Pressure drop in just the evaporator zone(when one studies the german boiler data) was also large Why all these things are not calculated for each section before winding up all the tubing is something I do question. As an example the 12GPH fired Lamont for Jim Crank(1070#/hr steam) utilized only 254 feet of tubing To have that much pressure drop(with that much tubing) with a 4.5GPH firing rate is not ideal, and the 550 feet of tubing you list is not the total I would believe.
Great plus on efforts! George
Re: experimental boiler design/build
December 31, 2012 01:25PM
Sorry to have made an error in the last post. There was a period missiong between "the 254feet of tubng To" as there was to be a period to start the new sentence "To" The Crank radial gas outflow boiiler with helical wound tubes(like Toms) only had 20calculated psi pressure drop in the entire boiler.
I think it would be great if SACA were to reprint Abner Dobles great article on boiler design from "Boiler House Review" in ithe early 1930's as all his info on flow velocities and tube sizes are still useful today. That article was later reprinted in Waltons book. Many good rules of thumb before all the high tech stuff of B@W and Cumbustion Engineering were developed.
From Toms great post of their 550 feet of tubing it appears that they have just from that tubing 45square feet of gas pass area just form those two coils and with a firing rate of 4.5 gallons of fuel equals @ 80# steam per gallon fired, thus about 360# per hour steam based upon a 500F flue gas temperature. The gallon per minute of water pumped(I am going from memory) would be equal to 480#/hr and much more then the burn rate would evaporate, thus the low output condition of the wet steam. Fire tube boilers, like the Stanley were very low producers of spteam per square foot of gas pass area and were lucky to evaporate 4#/sq.ft.hr. Dobles with the exhaust turbine booster could do 20# and a Lamont with safety 25. So if one is interested in getting the most out of a certain gas pass area tubing sizes, spaces, velocities are all of great consideration.
George
Re: experimental boiler design/build--update
May 24, 2013 12:15AM
Hello, fellow steamers:

Following a long time-out (during which you probably figured I had just become another drop-out) I can offer some updates on several projects. I'll try to feed them to you slowly so as to not dominate this forum.

First of these are the attached images which are of the 50-foot length of 3/8 OD 304 SS tubing, prewound by an outside supplier. This is to become my superheater coil as previously discussed.

Although significant work was already completed as received, the 2 most important improvements were to establish a specified and consistent gap between the coil turns--and also to stabilize the coil stack into a form of structural unity.

After several tries I found a way to do this with minimum material sophistication and minimum skills for the fabricator--something I believe to be important because I think this project may become a nice steam generator that almost any steam hobbyist could duplicate.

The attached photos show the final assembly--and also peer into the inside of the coil to reveal the stabilizing (tube) and spacing (drilled sheet metal) parts along with the SS safety wire lacing. Warning--you need to learn some patience if you're gonna duplicate this! Around 12-15 hours of grueling hand work, but worth it IMO.

Due to the machine-wound coil consistency, the result is nearly perfect in terms of spacing, and will suit my needs nicely if the design achieves its goals.

Again, I'll try to feed my updates at a reasonable rate; I think I may have inundated the forum with my posts (and enthusiasm) and I would like to avoid repeating that.

Happy steaming!

Bill


Re: experimental boiler design/build--update
May 24, 2013 06:39AM
Bill you can post as often as you like, you’re a doer, always appreciated.

Rolly
Re: experimental boiler design/build--update
May 24, 2013 03:39PM
Nice job Bill - the ties and inside supports are really tidy. I look forward to seeing more so don't worry about forum overload as it's great to see metal being cut!

Mike
Re: experimental boiler design/build--update
May 24, 2013 04:43PM
Rolly and Mike:

Thanks for your kind remarks.

Look for another post tomorrow, along with photos. I'm a great fan of, "a picture is worth a thousand words".

Bill
Re: experimental boiler design/build--update
May 24, 2013 06:59PM
Hi Bill.

This is a bit of hear say, that I do not remember who it came from. I remember talking with someone, I am fairly sure it was at a Danville meet, about using wire to hold tubes something like you are doing and was told it could have problems with warring through the tubes. That was for vehicle application were there would be mechanical vibrations. I do not know how true it might be. Hope someone will ring in here and clear it up. I hope it isn't a problem it would make holding tube spacing a lot simpler.

Andy
Re: experimental boiler design/build--update
May 25, 2013 12:42PM
steamerandy Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Hi Bill.
>
> This is a bit of hear say, that I do not remember
> who it came from. I remember talking with someone,
> I am fairly sure it was at a Danville meet, about
> using wire to hold tubes something like you are
> doing and was told it could have problems with
> warring through the tubes. That was for vehicle
> application were there would be mechanical
> vibrations. I do not know how true it might be.
> Hope someone will ring in here and clear it up. I
> hope it isn't a problem it would make holding tube
> spacing a lot simpler.

Andy:

I believe there might be a potential problem with trying to lace a tube stack with safety wire--but under what circumstances I'm not able to grasp at this point.

Due to the experimental nature of this project I chose something "low-tech", and safety wire seemed to be the best answer. If successful (as I am hoping) I can run it the way I built it, until something goes wrong; if the safety wiring proves unreliable there are some much more elegant solutions that can be brought to bear, but I'll wait for that effort, for later-on.

Bill
Re: experimental boiler design/build--update
May 25, 2013 01:00PM
Bill Hinote Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> Look for another post tomorrow, along with photos.

OK--here's a look at the completed evap coil stack, consisting of 100 feet of 3/8 OD (3/8 actual, that is, I believe it's 1/4 nominal) type K copper tubing (thanks Rolly!).

This was quite a bit more work than the SS superheater coil; in addition to winding it myself on my PVC mandrel, the lacing of the coil to the 3/4x3/4/1/8 steel verticals was much more arduous--and I was surprised at how much more prone to uncoiling the copper was than the stainless. There were times I felt like I was wrestling with a live python!

The final result is quite serviceable--but doesn't match the machine-like quality of the finished SS coil. The obvious reason is that I didn't provide a reliable feed for the copper from the as-delivered flat coil to the winding mandrel--and the result was some axial "wandering" that shows in the finished product. Further refinement of the winding procedure will easily rectify this issue for the next attempt (!). I tried to put "band-aids" on the worst offenders, you can see random locations of safety wire placed to pull the coils in various directions.

The coil gap is the same as the safety wire in this stack, .038"; the gap in the SS coil is .125" BTW.

Now, I'm on to sheet metal work, building the boiler casing. I still have my old spot welder from the original steam power efforts I did in the early '70's, the exact product is still available from Harbor Freight and does a really nice job.

The attached photos show the winding in progress, and the finished coil stack with the inlet and outlet aligned vertically to match the seam line in the sheet metal. Gotta plan ahead on this!

Bill



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/25/2013 01:31PM by Bill Hinote.


Re: experimental boiler design/build--update
May 25, 2013 02:26PM
I have heard of problems with tieing tubing but have never experienced any myself.
Attached is a photo of an economizer for a 23-inch Stanley boiler made up from a 100-foot coil. It’s wound from the outside in and then back out. The tie’s are all # 10 copper solid wire. I made up a jig and bent U to go around the tube and then bent the ends over a straight length of wire. This economizer has been in service over ten years.

Rolly


Re: experimental boiler design/build
May 28, 2013 07:23AM
Rolly , Someday you can teach us how to wind a coil from the outside in. There are two ways that I know of to wind two pancake coils at the same time so that one does not have to do the welding in the middle of the two pig tails. The one method appears to be one Doble used on an "F" boiler that was taken out of a Doble by Cal Tinkham when he was at Harrah's. A very tight radius "U" forging or something similar, possibly heated red hot and bent, piece of tubing was used. The long straight pieces of tubing for the two coils was butt welded to this "U" which was then clamped in the middle of a pancake coil winder and both tubes were wound while being side by side. This was used for the superheater section. The fact that the top tube partially masked the lower tube appears to be calculated. The second way to wind two coils at the same time is one I have used, having stolen the idea fair and square from someone else, and that is to butt weld however many pieces of pipe one needs for the two coils. I wound three pieces of 21' half inch tubing into two pancakes at one time. What you do is start in the middle by clamping the now 63' piece of pipe in the middle to the winder. One winds one coil and then flips the thing upside down and winds the other coil. Actually there is a slight variation that makes it easier to wind, and still do straight-on butt welds but it is too complex to explain. After a person has spent an hour jumping over 30' of pipe as it swings around one will figure out the easy way quite rapidly and on their own. Now that I think about it, the way to wind from the outside in and back out is exactly the way Pete Barrett demonstrated. He used a wooden spiral and conical form, put it in the lathe and started at the outside to the middle and back up the other form. Then he compressed the slightly frusto-conical coils flat and went from there. The methods that Doble and I use involve winding the pancakes flat with variable width spacers. Doble used thin strips of steel and multiplied them when wanting more spacing. I use strips of old conveyor belting, again of differing thickness or multiple layers. I do not use spacers for the outside half of coils as the natural springiness gives quite consistent spacing. Tom Kimmel
Re: experimental boiler design/build
May 28, 2013 01:47PM
Hi Tom

I think you might look up how Peter Barrett wound pancake coils on conic form. The form was made in two sections that mated the smallest sections together so it mad an hour glass shape. The conic section had spiral ramps the tube wound onto. The form cam apart in the center leaving the conic shaped spiral tube that was then forced into two flat pancake coils. So then you had one continuous coil forming two pancakes. One wound outside in and the other inside to outside. All welds were then on the outside perimeter. I think you might have pictures of in your collection.

Andy



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/30/2013 12:32AM by steamerandy.
sheet metal progress #1
May 28, 2013 02:46PM
Hi again:

The attached photo shows first progress on the boiler sheet metal.

The outer casing consists of 3 parts: 1) Combustion chamber (pictured) as the base; 2) Evap coil casing; and, 3) Conical top enclosing the superheater coil.

The seam of the evap casing will be screwed together with #10 SS sheet metal screws; this is so the coil can be removed with the top and bottom tube extensions intact. The other sections are permanently fastened using mostly spot welding.

I'm pleased with the quality of the bending, I'm using my own "invention", a simple sheet metal brake to assist in hand forming. If there's any interest I may create a separate post about this, it's quite effective.

There's a temporary wood form apparent in the photo; this holds the wobbly sheet metal tube perfectly round, while I install the combustion chamber base and the upper diaphragm several inches below the top. This will strengthen the casing so it holds its shape without additional bracing.

I'll post further progress in segments in the upcoming days.

Bill



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/29/2013 04:58AM by Bill Hinote.


Re: sheet metal progress #1
May 29, 2013 11:54AM
Great progress Bill, keep up the good work.
Chuck
Re: experimental boiler design/build
May 29, 2013 02:04PM
Rolly , Someday you can teach us how to wind a coil from the outside in.

Dear Tom I thought it was kind of simple, I made up a jig as I wanted to hold the spacing to a nominal 1/4 tube diameter and copper is kind of soft. Handling a 100 foot coil can be troublesome if your not careful. The jig was on a turntable as was the remaining coil.
The first layer was tied before the second layer was wound.
It is much harder working with Sch 40 pipe as you well know.

Rolly


sheet metal progress #2
May 29, 2013 09:08PM
Today, I completed and installed the "diaphragm". I've attached an image of it in place in the combustion chamber.

This item serves several purposes: 1) It reinforces the cylinder which is the boiler "jacket", and promotes its circular cross-section; 2) It contains the flame front and prevents still-burning fuel from escaping upwards into the coil stack and exposing the evap coil to an oxidizing environment; 3) The escaping gases from below are concentrated into a cyclone of increased rotational velocity; this homogenizes the hot gases and promotes even distribution of heat into the evap coil just above.

Most importantly, the vertical "fence" attached to the inside radius of the diaphragm stabilizes the horizontal disc, which would otherwise be warped by uneven heating. If you haven't tried it you may not believe it--until you see it happen!! Gotta watch dimensional control in thin sheet metal assemblies, I have a lot of experience with it from my pulsejet days. This stuff is tame by comparison.

The wood form is still in place and obvious in the photo, being utilized to maintain the desired circular form of the jacket which could (would!) otherwise be warped by the heat from the spot-welding process. Final fabrication/installation details will be the "floor" disc of the combustion chamber, and exterior brackets which will create mount points for the boiler assembly when I finally install it in a vehicle.

Trying to make progress on a daily basis.

Bill



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 05/29/2013 11:56PM by Bill Hinote.


Re: sheet metal progress #3
June 02, 2013 09:11PM
Hi again:

Attached is an image of the completed combustion chamber section of the boiler casing, with all its "accoutrements" in place.

The image also shows the successful fitting of the evap coil; the diaphragm (previously described) is the base upon which the evap coil assembly will rest--and so it has substantial structural reinforcements to feed the vertical loads (weight) of the coil into the casing walls and then into the tabs which will be attached to the mounts on the vehicle of choice, or the test breadboard.

I'm currently downloading a first test firing of the combustion chamber assembly (couldn't wait!), I'll get a link to it afterwards.
It doesn't look as spectacular as the first effort with the soup pot--but that is an indication of success as it means the burner confinement is working according to plan.

Stay tuned for more.

B.


test firing the comb. chamber
June 02, 2013 10:19PM
Bill Hinote Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> I'm currently downloading a first test firing of
> the combustion chamber assembly (couldn't wait!),
> I'll get a link to it afterwards.
> It doesn't look as spectacular as the first effort
> with the soup pot--but that is an indication of
> success as it means the burner confinement is
> working according to plan.

OK--here's the link to the newest youtube vid clip.

[www.youtube.com]

This doesn't really look like much--but that's actually the biggie as it means the combustion process is being contained below the diaphragm--and only hot products of combustion are escaping upward to go through the coil stacks.

Success is mine, so far. Lots more to do.

B.
Re: test firing the comb. chamber
June 03, 2013 05:54PM
Bill Hinote Wrote:

> This doesn't really look like much--but that's
> actually the biggie as it means the combustion
> process is being contained below the
> diaphragm--and only hot products of combustion are
> escaping upward to go through the coil stacks.

Hi again:

Actually I'm fighting with what I hope is going to be a minor issue.

I found in my first experiments that it was necessary to place a "diverter" piece in the path of the tangential entry of the burning gases; the reason for this is that it bounces off the inner wall of the boiler jacket without the diverter--and because of the highly oxidating environment would result in an early burn-through of an important part.

My solution is to place a diverter which keeps the still active flame front from the boiler jacket and deflects it around further where it mixes with other gases swirling in the combustor region.

I have opted to create the diverter and install it in such a way that it can be easily replaced; this is based on the expected (short) life while using basic 304 SS sheet materials. OTOH I would really like to obtain a chunk of 310 grade SS, minimum dimension allowable is 4x6 inches and anything .062" thick or less. The 310 grade is considered to be the most durable in high temp, high oxygen environments.

If anyone has a chunk they can offer at a reasonable price that fits my specs I would like to hear from you; just PM me on this website.

Thanks in advance,

Bill
Re: test firing the comb. chamber
June 03, 2013 07:20PM
Bill
You can get small pieces of special alloys from, (A slice of stainless.)
I use them occasionally.
[www.sliceofstainless.com]

Rolly
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burner assy composite.jpg 234.4 KB open | download Bill Hinote 11/09/2012 Read message
boiler design 2.jpg 325.6 KB open | download Bill Hinote 11/16/2012 Read message
Tubeing.jpg 90.1 KB open | download Rolly 11/18/2012 Read message
tps.png 11 KB open | download frustrated 11/21/2012 Read message
PVC pipe for mandrel.JPG 260.8 KB open | download Bill Hinote 12/07/2012 Read message
3 8 ths copper test wind.JPG 193.1 KB open | download Bill Hinote 12/10/2012 Read message
SS coil as delivered.JPG 206.9 KB open | download Bill Hinote 12/22/2012 Read message
SS superheater coil done 1.JPG 220.5 KB open | download Bill Hinote 05/24/2013 Read message
SS superheater coil done 2.JPG 282.8 KB open | download Bill Hinote 05/24/2013 Read message
coil winding in progress.JPG 218.3 KB open | download Bill Hinote 05/25/2013 Read message
evap coil done.JPG 195.7 KB open | download Bill Hinote 05/25/2013 Read message
Stanley Economizer .JPG 156.1 KB open | download Rolly 05/25/2013 Read message
Tieing tubing.jpg 33.8 KB open | download Rolly 05/25/2013 Read message
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Die-1.JPG 102.3 KB open | download Rolly 05/29/2013 Read message
diaphragm in place.JPG 174.6 KB open | download Bill Hinote 05/29/2013 Read message
comb done w evap coil placed.JPG 204.5 KB open | download Bill Hinote 06/02/2013 Read message
evap jacket in place.JPG 156.1 KB open | download Bill Hinote 06/04/2013 Read message
30 hp Baker Burner 6.4.13 002.jpg 72.2 KB open | download SSsssteamer 06/06/2013 Read message
evap jacket done.jpg 290.9 KB open | download Bill Hinote 06/22/2013 Read message
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